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16 Startup Metrics

Andreessen Horowitz

We have the privilege of meeting with thousands of entrepreneurs every year, and in the course of those discussions are presented with all kinds of numbers, measures, and metrics that illustrate the promise and health of a particular company. Sometimes, however, the metrics may not be the best gauge of what’s actually happening in the business, or people may use different definitions of the same metric in a way that makes it hard to understand the health of the business.

So, while some of this may be obvious to many of you who live and breathe these metrics all day long, we compiled a list of the most common or confusing metrics. Where appropriate, we tried to add some notes on why investors focus on those metrics. Ultimately, though, good metrics aren’t about raising money from VCs — they’re about running the business in a way where founders know how…

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Beyond Bitcoin: Commercial Applications of Blockchain Technology

Ali Rahimtula

mesh

Introduction

Much has been made of the potential of bitcoin, the currency, but the venture capital community is increasingly focusing on the commercial potential of the underlying blockchain technology. Perhaps more interestingly, executives at large and sophisticated incumbent financial institutions and financial technology companies that I have spoken to, by and large, do not dismiss the technology. They believe it has legs and are studying the technology with a goal to enhance their product offerings. In short, many incumbents have a blockchain strategy. The general spirit is that the blockchain is like the Internet; sure, some businesses were disrupted and rendered obsolete, but the Internet made most financial services and other industry products better.

While many questions remain, the blockchain’s core features – decentralization, speed, low take rates, and stability (i.e. hard to hack) – allow it the potential to reinvent many industries. Beyond banking and payments processing, there are…

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What happens if Bitcoin mining companies vertically integrate?

Richard Gendal Brown

Creeping centralization can come in many forms – are the Web Application Server wars a lesson from the past?!

First some history of the IT industry (you can skip this bit if you just want the meat…)

Travel back in time with me to the late nineties…. I started my career during the Web Application Server wars. The web was taking off in the late nineties and companies like WebLogic (quickly acquired by BEA) spotted a need in the marked for a Web Application Server.

They were solving an obvious problem: it was a real pain to write proper applications. Sure: you could write HTML and run it on Apache. And you could use the CGI interface to have scripts run to generate basic dynamic content. But it was painful to do anything more sophisticated

If you were a bank that wanted to build an online banking service…

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My 2 Cents on CEO Pay

blog maverick

There is a game played by CEOs with the corporate issuance of lottery tickets. Otherwise known as stock. Stock can be issued in any number of ways, shapes or forms. Warrants, options, restricted or unrestricted stock. No matter what you call it, every CEO hired, is asking for equity knowing that their only goal is to hit the jackpot and create a pool of wealth that puts them in the “fuck you” wealth category. Thats enough money to buy or rent just about anything you can think of and put you in position to never have to work again. You just live off the cash in the bank.

Put another way, every hired CEO is looking to be in a position to look in the mirror , smile and tell themselves they have made it. They are living the American dream. The only way to do that is to grab…

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FIDOR Bank

Matthias Kröner from FIDOR Bank posted a response in the comments on What would a disruptive bank look like? which I thought deserved its own post.

Fidor Bank LogoJack, it was absolutely thrilling to read your blog. Your blog and the – out of that – resulting discussion I really find unique. I am happy to participate in that particular discussion, because we build a real disruptive bank that corresponds with your criterias. The name of that Bank: FIDOR Bank.

How do I come to that bold opinion? Best proof would be to apply your criterias. So, lets see:

1. We are a real bank. We received banking license from the German banking regulators. That was in May 2009, so exactly in the eye of the crisis-storm and this as an entrepreneurial and independent team. No big banking group supporting (or blocking) us. We started business in Jan 2010 with a very rudimental offer.

2…

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What would a disruptive bank look like?

A while back, I got into a to-and-fro on Twitter with Marc Andreessen and Chris Dixon about banking, which garnered a fair amount of interest and commentary1234, after Marc declared that he is “dying to fund a disruptive bank“.

So far, finance startups have shied away getting their own banking licence, opting to use an existing bank instead. Movenbank and BankSimple talked up their plans to shake up banking but, in the end, both dropped “bank” from their name and partnered with CBW Bank and Bancorp respectively (Simple was subsequently acquired by BBVA). In effect, they built a presentation layer on top of an existing bank. I don’t think that’s the path to the future of banking. Even if you ignore the downsides of building a business on someone else’s platform, I believe that you can’t be truly disruptive unless you build the full stack.

A bank can be broken…

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Discerning Technologist

In a blog post today, Simple announced some more UX goodness is being added to its web application (and eventually all updates will migrate to their mobile iOS app).

Merry Early Christmas (or a little late happy Hanukkah). Here’s a quick break down.

They first announced something a little different, something more of us should really pay closer attention to – onboarding. It sets the tone, and if the initial experience goes smoothly, it makes the first six months of activity, cross sell, and long-term retention just that much easier. As most Simple fans are aware, they are attempting be as Apple-like as possible – attempting to simplify the traditional banking experience, from the way you request an invite to the way you receive your initial debit card (Bank Innovation’s JJ Hornblass does a good job of covering that here).

New users are now being invited to view an…

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